Indian Country

Tribal Direct Lending

Housing

Chickasaw Community Bank (formerly known as Bank2) is a 100% tribally-owned bank and experienced tribal lender. We have the ability to lend directly to the Tribes, Housing Authorities (HAs) or Tribally Designated Entities (TDHEs) to meet all of your tribal housing needs. We can help you take advantage of various government-guaranteed loan programs that can provide you with solutions today, not tomorrow. On the Tribal level, you’ll be able to secure the funding you need to build and/or rehab existing properties and to meet your needs and assist families with housing.

Tribes

You don’t need to be reliant on government funding, especially when we can show you how to leverage your funds and maximize your tribal benefits. Tribes, HA’s, TDHE’s all can act as the borrower, using the bank’s funds instead of money from the government. You’ll be working hand-in-hand with a native-owned business that is experienced and excited to help you in meeting the housing needs of your tribe, village or pueblo. Other tribes have used these programs for lease-to-own properties, building duplexes, or developing housing for their elders. You’re not limited to just single-family homes, as you can also take advantage of these programs for duplexes, triplexes, quad-plexes, and more! These programs are possible for everyone, and they offer flexible and versatile solutions to meet your specific housing needs. The government guaranty of our loans makes it possible for these programs to lend on and off reservations, tribal trust, allotments, Fee Simple and Fee-Simple Restricted lands. 

See the programs below for specific details. You can also contact Nancy Bainbridge, Senior Vice-President of Tribal and Construction Loans, for additional information. Chickasaw Community Bank is HUD-certified for HUD 184 and Title VI loan programs.

HUD 184

The Section 184 program was designed to help meet the challenges of Indian Housing for tribes as well as individual tribal members. Under this program, the tribes, HA, or TDHE acts as the borrower, using money borrowed from the bank instead of the government. This capital can be used to fund new housing construction, buy a home, or to rehab existing housing. By using our money there are no income restrictions on the tenants. This allows tribes to create additional opportunities and programs for the moderate income people who are often under served. The HUD 184 program can be used for single family residences all the way up to four-plexes for various purposes, both on and off trust land. Take advantage of today’s interest rates and construction costs instead of putting them off until tomorrow. Leverage the tribal funds of 200,000 plus members to provide homes for dozens of families instead of just a few. We’re experience in working with these programs and making them work for our customers. Call us to see what it can do for you!  

Title VI

The Title VI Loan program is one of the most misunderstood financial programs available to tribal members and entities. It leverages the IHBG grant and lends you funds from a bank in the form of a loan made to the tribal member, HA or TDHE. It’s a great way to help you meet your housing challenges today. Do not wait for tomorrow and the inevitable rise in interest rates and contractor expenses. This program is a great way to alleviate some of your housing needs and you owe it to yourself to investigate how it can be used for your benefit. The loan amount is based on five (5x) times your Needs Allocation and can be amortized over 20 years. 

Utilizing the Title VI program by itself or in conjunction with other programs (such as the HUD 184) tribes or TDHE’s acting as the borrower can use those funds form their lender to provide for mixed-income homes, supportive housing, senior housing, VA housing, rehab centers, community centers and more. What’s more, you can undertake these projects on or off of tribal lands. We’re experts in navigating the possibilities and versatility of this program, so get in touch with us today and let’s put it to work for you. 

USDA

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has several programs that tribes, HA’s & TDHE’s can use to meet, supplement, or enhance their housing needs. Some of these programs are loan guaranty programs while others are direct loans through the USDA and other organizations that work together with loans and grants from Chickasaw Community Bank. As a tribally owned bank, Chickasaw Community Bank can work with the USDA loan programs and find a way to customize them to meet your specific needs.

The USDA Community Facilities Direct Loan and Grant programs may be used either independently or in collaboration with another government guaranty program such as the HUD 184 or Title VI. It provides for a wide array of possibilities and enhancements, so it’s always to your benefit to investigate what they offer and see how it can be applied to your situation.

Customize these programs

Utilizing the Title VI program by itself or in conjunction with other programs (such as the HUD 184) tribes or TDHE’s acting as the borrower can use those funds form their lender to provide for mixed-income homes, supportive housing, senior housing, VA housing, rehab centers, community centers and more. What’s more, you can undertake these projects on or off of tribal lands. We’re experts in navigating the possibilities and versatility of this program, so get in touch with us today and let’s put it to work for you. 

You can also contact Nancy Bainbridge, Senior Vice-President of Tribal and Construction Loans for additional information. Chickasaw Community Bank is HUD-certified for HUD 184 and Title VI loan programs. We have years of experience, and we can put all that experience to work for you.

Connect with us today!

Learn more about Tribal Direct Lending.

Call us at 405.946.2265 or email us at contactus@ccb.bank

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